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The Flashback Pheasant Tail Nymph!

... the "improved" PTN!

The Flashback Pheasant Tail Nymph

The Pheasant Tail Nymph is one of the oldest of modern fly fishing patterns.  Originally designed as a general imitation to many of the thin nymphs that exist in rivers, streams and stillwaters worldwide, it’s success in representing nymphs of the Baetis family allowed it to quickly become world famous.

In this flyguys.net version of the PTN we have added a bead head and a flashback wing case to better represent the ready to emerge mayfly nymph … two modifications that we have noticed to greatly increase our success with the fly! The trout love it and therefore so do we! :)

Ingredients:

  • Thread: Brown- 8/0
  • Hook: Togen Natural Bend – Size #14
  • Bead: Togen Copper – Size 3/32
  • Body: Pheasant Tail – Natural
  • Rib: Copper Wire – Size Small
  • Thorax: Peacock Herl
  • Wing Case: Pearl Mylar
  • Tail: Pheasant Tail -Natural
  • Head Cement: “krazy” Glue

 Cooking Instructions:

... ok let's tie the PTN!

as usual start with the bead on the hook .......

... the tail should be about but no longer than the hook.

tie in a few pheasant tail fibers for the tail .......

... tie in the fibers by the tip!

tie in a few PT fibers & the copper rib .......

... counter wind the rib!

wind the PT fibers & wire rib forward .......

... adjust legs to ensure proper length when folded back!

tie in a few PT fibers for the legs (points out over the eye) ...

... almost done!

trim off the excess leg material & tie in mylar wing case ...

... time to wind it all together!

tie in a few strands of peacock herl for the thorax ....

... the thorax should be slightly thicker than the body!

wind the peacock herl forward to form the thorax .......

... be sure to split the legs evenly to each side.

split the legs & hold them along side the body while pulling the mylar over the top & tying off behind the bead ...

... the flyguys flashback PTN!

whip finish, head cement & you're done! :)

Fish this fly near or on weedy bottoms of shallows, shoals and drop offs. In the absence of an emergence imitate the nymph crawling amongst the weeds by working the fly slowly along the bottom with a few short quick jerks thrown in every 20 to 30 seconds. During a hatch retrieve the fly slowly but steadily upward through the water column with a pause for several seconds every once in a while.

* for more information on the traits & techniques to fish mayflies check out our mayfly page!

Tight lines! :cool:

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About krazy

....... fish, hunt, repeat!
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3 Responses to The Flashback Pheasant Tail Nymph!

  1. ricer says:


    two of my favorite’s
    full flashback patterns – using antistatic bag for the flash

  2. ricer says:

    Very similar to the pattern above.
    Only difference is tying in the flashback at the same time as the rib (after tying in the tail)
    Then tie in 6-7 strands by the tips and wrap 3/4 up for the body.
    Pull antistatic over (tie off but don’t trim) wrap wire(fine red) and tie off
    Next, tie in legs forward then tie in herl for thorax
    Split legs and pull forward antistatic and whip finish!

    Key – tungsten copper bead 3/32

    Fished: under an indicator close to the bottom. Twitched often or wind drifted.
    Worked great for the biggies along the weeds in Monster Bay!

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